Love Me! David Hoffmeister, “Movie Watcher’s Guide to Enlightenment” on “The Great Gatsby” and the Treachery of Specialness

David Hoffmeister, Movie Watcher’s Guide to Enlightenment:

The ego offers the familiar, the romantic relationship. We have glimpsed that there is "something more" and we want to open to it, yet at a certain point the ego says "no" to leaving the personal relationship. Trust allows us to open to the Holy Spirit and spiritual vision, the unfamiliar. We want intimacy and freedom and have looked for it in the body. Jesus offers us freedom of the mind. We may want to try for the best of both worlds. Yet only when we give our full attention to heaven, do we find true freedom and intimacy. We become strikingly happy! Intimacy and communication continue beyond the body. Spirit inspired communication, love, comes through us and fills us up.

Movie Watchers Guide To Enlightenment

The movie The Great Gatsby shows us that seeking happiness outside ourselves fails. Jesus in A Course in Miracles tells us that: “The world I see holds nothing that I want” (W-28) and “Beyond this world there is a world I want” (W-29)

Mini Review The Great Gatsby

Emotion/Theme: Self Concept, Special Relationship, Loneliness, Addiction, Money

Genre: Drama, Romance

Summary: The desire for special love and a self-concept apart from God is the desire for death. Jay Gatsby decides at an early age that wealth and success will be his chosen self-concept. Jesus calls the special love relationship the ego's most boasted gift and when we meet Jay at his mansion years later, we see a man possessed of an idealized vision of his first love, Daisy. Upon meeting Daisy, Jay knows intuitively that should he kiss her, the connection to his Source will be covered over by the illusion of love, but he consciously decides to kiss her anyway.

Despite the fact that Daisy and Jay have had no communication for many years and Daisy has married, he has the fixed idea that he can complete himself and fulfill his life dream only with Daisy. Gatsby’s deep sense of lack and unworthiness propel him to build an outrageously wealthy and glamorous lifestyle with which to impress Daisy and win her back.

It's impossible to possess and love someone at the same time. Love gives freely to all. Jay desperately believes that it is possible to change the past and he tries with all his might. In the end, all roadways of the world lead to death.

More from David Hoffmeister on Awakening!

Hundreds of FREE David Hoffmeister videos

Wake up with the Movie Watcher's Guide to Enlightenment!

 

Written by : LMCenter